Osteopathy is a form of manual therapy that treats the whole little person. Our osteopaths will carefully select the most appropriate treatment techniques to aim to maximizethe comfort of you and your growing baby.

Changes during pregnancy

During pregnancy, your body undergoes tremendous change to accommodate your growing baby. As your pregnancy progresses, the extra weight creates a shift in your body’s centre of gravity. Your supporting ligaments of the spine will also soften. These factors can add stress to your body, which may lead to back pain, sciatica, pelvic pain and neck pain. Our osteopaths can offer advice about managing these symptoms and demonstrate self-help techniques which you and your partner can use during pregnancy and labour.

 

Birthing and beyond

Osteopathy for Infants & Children

As Osteopaths, we recognize the particular stresses on the body children experience as they grow from babies to teenagers.

Many things can happen in life that may cause some pain or symptoms. Childhood accidents and falls, or simply the young body’s rapid growth can create or contribute to problems associated with bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons, and nerves. Other issues faced by children include posture problems, inflammatory conditions, and sporting injuries.

Our osteopaths will work with you and your child to find the best way to reduce your child’s symptoms. We take a complete medical history, conduct an examination, and ask you and your child questions. This will help us to determine which type of osteopathic treatment is most appropriate and if any referrals to other health practitioners are needed. We will also offer advice on general nutrition and health, posture and exercise.

Conditions that osteopaths treat in children and teenagers include:

  • back pain and headaches
  • growing pains in muscles, bones and joints
  • postural problems including curvature of the spine
  • walking difficulties or foot pain
  • sporting injuries

Osteopathic care may be able to assist the young body to adapt to growth-related changes.

 

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