Pie Maker Hot Cross Buns

Would you fancy super fresh, chocolate chip hot cross buns for breakky?!?

We have the recipe for you!

And so easy! These hot buns take 12 minutes in the pie maker. Sooooo yummy!!!!

CHOCOLATE CHIP HOT CROSS BUNS- Pie Maker Style

Makes 6 | 18mins to make

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 1/2 cups flour- I used 1 1/2 cups buckwheat flour & 1 cup almond meal so they were gluten-free. You can use 2 1/2 cups self-raising flour.
  • 1 cup milk of choice
  • 4 tbs yoghurt
  • 1 tsp bicarb soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp mixed spice
  • 200g chocolate chip

LETS COOK

  • combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix- if it is a little sticky, add a little more flour to make it doughey
  • scoop out dough and roll into palm size balls
  • place in pie maker
  • cook for approximately 12mins
  • enjoy!!! So delish!

Telehealth in Osteopathy

The world is changing. Now comes a need for innovation and lateral thinking to continue to provide our patients with excellent care and service. Telehealth, while reasonably new in Osteopathy, aims to bridge a much needed gap in health communication. In this blog we will explore what Telehealth is, discuss what to expect in an online consultation, and answer some common questions.

Telehealth occurs in place of a typical consultation when distance and other factors create barriers for face to face consultation. It involves the use of a video based service which allows us to conduct an online consultation between practitioner and patient. 

As Osteopaths, we acknowledge that a large part of our practice is in the form of manual therapy, which is difficult to replicate in an online consultation. However, we are still able to provide you with the great service we are known for! The assessment, diagnostic advice, lifestyle advice, rehabilitation programs and self-therapy strategies we give are all still the same. We can still advise you on what you should and shouldn’t do; the best ways to stretch this and strengthen that; and help educate you about any injury you may have.  We want to empower you to help yourself!

The benefits of offering Telehealth are varied:

– Allows us to overcome any distance barriers.
– Cheaper consultation fee.
– No travel time required.
– Can be completed in more varied environments – home, work etc
– Allows the practitioner to assess ergonomic setup if necessary.

Before your consult

In the lead up to your appointment time, our team will be in touch via email with a link to download the necessary software to conduct the consultation. We are currently using a software program called Zoom which is a free and easy-to-use video conference service. Electronic equipment required is outlined in the FAQ section below.
10-15 minutes before your scheduled consultation, we will get in touch to troubleshoot any software problems or other issues which you may have. 
Our team will also send through detailed instructions of how to complete payment (via the use of encrypted software) which can be completed following the consultation. 
It is also a good idea to setup your home desk before the consult. See some ergonomic tips via one of our blog posts here.

During your consult

Your online consultation will follow in the same manner as your typical physical consultation, minus the manual therapy of course! Your practitioner will conduct the normal case history and ask you some questions about your injury, before doing a physical assessment. The assessment will generally require you to demonstrate different movements and activities, as well as placing your body into different positions to help your practitioner ascertain what is going on.
Upon completing the physical assessment, your practitioner will take you through different strategies in order to help your condition – this may include self-massage instructions, management advice, rehab advice, lifestyle advice, ergonomic advice or (likely) a combination of all of the above.  

Your consultation is likely to take around 20 minutes rather than the usual 30 minutes we have in physical consultations. 

After your consult 

Following your consultation, your practitioner will send any resources or management plans through to you via email. They can also discuss any future appointments with you.
At this point you can finalise your payment through the steps outlined in the initial email before your first consultation. 


FAQs

You may not have even heard the term ‘Telehealth’ before this week. Let’s go through a few frequently asked questions surrounding Telehealth and online consultation in general.

How do I book in a Telehealth consultation?

The easiest way to book in a telehealth consultation with one of our practitioners is online – just as you do with your normal consult. You will have to select the ‘Telehealth’ appointment type. If you are finding this difficult or would rather speak to someone before booking, you can give us a call on (03) 9773 8085. 

What equipment will I require?

As a minimum, you will require a stable internet connection, as well as a mobile device, tablet, laptop or desktop computer with a webcam and microphone. Laptop or desktop computers are ideal as we will often ask you to step away from your device to demonstrate certain movements and exercises.

Does the online consultation cost the same amount as my regular consultation?

No – a reduced fee (half price) will be charged for your online consultation.

How can I provide payment for my consultation?

An email detailing payment will be sent to you before your initial consultation which outlines the method in which you can pay the consultation fee. 

Do I need a follow up appointment?

As with our regular physical service, the amount of consultations required for each individual is varied. We will discuss this with you during your consultation. 

Is this covered by my private health insurance?

Osteopathy Telehealth appointments are not currently covered by private health cover. 

What should I wear during my consultation?

As with your regular consultation, it is best to wear loose, comfortable clothing for your online consultation. Remember that your practitioner will need to be able to assess your movement through the video stream only, so appropriate clothing is really important.

If you have any questions surrounding Telehealth or would like to gather some more information, please give our team at Total Balance Healthcare a call on (03) 9773 8085. Otherwise, we look forward to seeing you online

How to Supercharge your Immune System

Catching a bug and getting sick is no fun for anyone. When it does hit, you can feel miserable.

The best way to help this is to avoid it all together!!!

Here are ways to supercharge your immune system.

1. Garlic

Garlic is an awesome herb that you can cook with and take in your daily nutrition! It has anti- bacterial and anti-microbial properties as well as reduces blood pressure, reduces cholesterol and is a natural anti-histamine.

Include it in your cooking- you can buy minced garlic or fresh garlic. Both will do the trick.

HOME REMEDY

  • Gently warm 1 teaspoon of fennel seeds (in the health food aisle of the supermarket) and 1 teaspoon of caraway seeds (in the health food aisle) in 100ml of Apple Cider Vinegar (don’t boil)
  • Take it off the heat and add in about 10 peeled and crushed garlic cloves. Mix through.
  • Strain the mix, add 2 tablespoons of raw honey.

You can use this as both a medicine and salad dressing.

2. Vitamin C

An old faithful and something you can easily get from both your diet (fresh fruits and vegetables) and as a supplement from any pharmacy or health food store. Vitamin C is a potent antioxidant, which is great not only for the immune system but also for our cardiovascular system and skin.

3. Zinc

Zinc is one of those minerals that serves many purposes in our body and deficiencies can lead to poor immune function, along with other disorders.

Supplementing with Zinc can be done by increasing Zinc containing foods to the diet or using a good quality commercial supplement.

Foods high in Zinc include:

  • beef
  • baked beans (home made versions not those sugar filled commercially available varieties)
  • cashews
  • egg yolks
  • ginger
  • herrings
  • lamb
  • oysters
  • sunflower and pumpkin seeds
  • wholegrains
  • yeast

4. Water

So simple, yet during the colder months something we often forget about. Water flushes out toxins from our body, supports the production of lymph, keeps our bowels working well (if we don’t drink enough water then we will often suffer from constipation) plus it supports mood and concentration by keeping our brains hydrated.

Aim to drink 1.5- 2 litres of water a day. This can be as water with fruit infused in it, herbal teas or plain water. Avoid counting coffee or black tea as water intake as caffeine is dehydrating.

5. Manuka Honey

Manuka Honey contains strong anti-bacterial properties that have been found to be effective against digestive, skin and throat infections. When a sore throat hits a spoonful of honey doesn’t just make the medicine go down, it is the medicine. It can be used topically for skin infections, burns and blisters and is great to use on a daily basis just for health maintenance.

Manuka honey can be found at the supermarket.

6. Herbs

There are a heap of herbs that you can buy at the supermarket or health food store that can supercharge your immune system.

These include:

  • ginger
  • elderberry
  • echinacea
  • astragalus
  • andrographis

7. Gut Health

As 70% of the immune system is in the gut, it is the best idea to support it so we support great immune function.

First, we need to feed the good bacteria with fibre. These can be found in fruit and vegetables. You can also take a fibre supplement from the health food store- be wary of heap nasty “fibre” supplements.

Secondly, a probiotic can help support the good bacteria in the gut. There are some fantastic practitioner only probiotics available at many pharmacies.

AVOID SUGAR- this is inflammatory to the gut along with alcohol. Sorry! Neither of these are doing your immune system any favours.

Eat lots of fruit and veggies– support that good gut microbiome that contributes to 70% of the immune system.

7. Sleep

A very important aspect of a healthy immune system is simple yet something we find so difficult. A lack of sleep allows the body to be constantly tired and never recharging fully. At these times, we’ll find our immune system becomes compromised and we become susceptible to illness.

Adults require eight hours of sleep per night to enable our body to produce hormones, proteins and chemicals to maintain a healthy immune system.

Sleep deprivation leaves us more vulnerable to viruses and bacterial infections.

8. Keep Moving

Gentle, low heart rate exercise is great for the immune system. Gently moving your muscles pumps the lymphatic system which houses the immune system outside of the gut. This allows the lymphatic system to flush away any viruses or bacteria that your body is fighting.

9. Vitamin D

Vitamin D is a nutrient that has been shown to be particularly beneficial for people who are prone to respiratory infections & asthma.  Whilst many people already take vitamin D, it is a good idea to have your levels tested to see where they are at before taking vitamin D – more is not always better, and too much can be dangerous. 

Vitamin D testing is available here at Total Balance or through your GP.

Your 1:1 Support

There are a variety of ways Dr. Rebecca Farthing (osteopath & naturopath) can support your immune system naturally.  Seeing a practitioner has many benefits over self-prescribing products of unknown effectiveness, including:

  • Ensuring supplements are safe alongside your medications
  • Ensuring the safety of herbs and supplements during pregnancy or breastfeeding
  • Matching the right herbs to your needs if you suffer from an autoimmune condition, as you don’t want to exacerbate your condition by overstimulating your immune system
  • In-clinic and functional pathology testing options – as mentioned above, we can check for things like vitamin D and zinc, but also look at your immune cells with live blood analysis
  • Travel preparation & supplement recommendations to give you the best chance of a healthy, hassle-free trip
  • Minimizing sick days and supporting quicker recovery (adults AND children)
  • Ensuring you aren’t wasting money on unnecessary supplements – often we are able to keep supplements to a minimum by supporting a few key areas
  • Guiding you to the best quality, most potent products.  Practitioner-only products are tested for potency and use dosages that match those used in clinical research.  It can be extremely difficult to obtain these kinds of dosages when using over-the-counter/online products.  Practitioner products are also designed to be hypoallergenic with superior absorption.  By seeing a practitioner you can be assured you are getting the most bang for your buck.

Do you want to supercharge your immune system? Dr. Rebecca Farthing (osteopath & naturopath) is available for consultations to support your and your family’s immune health. Book online or call us on 9773 8085


This blog post is an educational tool only.  It is not a replacement for medical advice from a registered and qualified doctor or health professional.



Any other questions not answered here? Get in touch with us!

Phone: (03) 9773 8085

Here are some of our other blogs that you may like to read 🙂



Aching Joints? Your Natural Approach To Joint Care

by Dr. Rebecca Farthing (Osteopath & Naturopath)

There are many things that can cause tender, aching or painful joints. Sometimes, it can just be an acute injury, or it could be something more chronic such as arthritis. But the good news is that your joints can be supported naturally. Here are some of my top tips for sore joints.

Stay hydrated

Keeping yourself hydrated is essential for joint health. It encourages lymphatic flow, allowing the body to flush out toxins from the area. It’s also important for ensuring sufficient blood and nutrient flow to the area, which supports healing.

Everyone has a different need when it comes to hydration. A good starting point is building up to 2L of water per day. If it’s a cold day, herbal teas can make up the bulk of your water intake.

Keep it warm

Many of us were taught to use ice on any type of injury. But the research is starting to show that heat may be better for long-term healing. The same goes for your joints. 

Using heat, such as heat packs or a warm bath, can improve blood flow to the area. This means that more nutrients and healing factors can reach the injured area and repair any damage quickly.

Stock up on soup

Soup is one of the best ways to get nutrients into the body. You can add plenty of vegetables, herbs and spices that are all full of nutrients to support joint healing. Soup made using bones, often termed ‘bone broth’, also contains gelatin. Gelatin contains the amino acids that your body needs to repair damaged joints.

Eat a rainbow

If your joints are sore, what you want is a natural anti-inflammatory. That’s where eating a variety of coloured fruits and vegetables comes in. Fruits and vegetables such as berries and green leafy veg are full of antioxidants that protect the body from inflammation and oxidative stress. Reducing inflammation can reduce pain levels.

Aim to include at least 4-5 different colours on your plate each day. Add a side of blueberries to your breakfast, chop up some red capsicum, carrot and spinach to go with lunch, and mix some mushrooms into your pasta sauce. It’s that easy!

Minimise the junk

While you want to increase your antioxidant and anti-inflammatory foods, you also want to reduce the foods that have the opposite effect. That means foods that are highly processed and packed with things like added sugars and additives.

Many processed foods contain compounds known as AGEs, which have been shown to cause inflammation. So try to find healthier versions of your favourite treats instead.

Consider therapeutic supplements

Food should always be your first approach when it comes to wellbeing. But if you are dealing with a chronic condition like arthritis, supplements are worth considering. There are a number that show promise in joint health, including glucosamine, chondroitin, turmeric and magnesium. 

However, supplements can vary greatly in quality. The best way to find the right supplements for you is to work with a practitioner who can access high-quality therapeutic supplements for you.



Do you have joint pain? If you would like to investigate this further, please book an appointment with one of our Osteopaths who will be able to assess you and put a management plan in place that is specific to you. 


This blog post is an educational tool only.  It is not a replacement for medical advice from a registered and qualified doctor or health professional.

Any other questions not answered here? Get in touch with us!

Phone: (03) 9773 8085

Here are some of our other blogs that you may like to read 🙂




Do you have a magnesium deficiency?

Did you know that magnesium is responsible for the regulation and execution of over 300 enzyme processes in the body…..yes 300!!

It is one of the most abundant minerals in the body. But what is it? And what does it do? What are the types of magnesium? And why are some of us deficient?

Firstly, let’s talk about some of these 300 processes magnesium is involved with….

It regulates protein synthesis and muscle building, maintains healthy nerve function, regulates blood pressure and keeps a healthy heartbeat, sustains optimal immune function, it is responsible for helping bone to form, has a role in DNA and RNA synthesis and repair and also contributes to the production of antioxidants within your body.

Magnesium is not easily absorbed in the body unless it is attached to a transporting substance. 

For this reason, many supplement manufacturers have “chelated” magnesium to organic and amino acids. So what are the different types? 

  • Magnesium Glycinate: A magnesium salt of a compound called glycine, which is an amino acid. It is usually the best option to help correct magnesium deficiency, is easily absorbed and has a fairly high bowel tolerance level
  • Magnesium Oxide: A less bioavailable form of magnesium and is usually used for treating acid reflux and sour stomachs. It is also useful for those wanting to alleviate constipation.
  • Magnesium Citrate: A combined form of magnesium and citric acid. It is usually used by doctors preparing patients for a colonoscopy. It has an acidic PH and is good for maintaining healthy serum magnesium levels.
  • Magnesium Malate: Magnesium paired with malic acid, which is commonly found in fruits. It is ideal for targeted fatigue-specific conditions and depression, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Malic acid is also part of the Krebs cycle, which is where much of our cellular energy is generated. 
  • Magnesium Taurate: Magnesium combine with Taurine, which has been shown to be one of the most beneficial elements in helping to promote longer lifespans. Magnesium taurate supplements have demonstrated the ability to treat cases of depression, vascular health and the prevention of neurodegenerative disorders and migranes.
  • Magnesium Threonate: This is a relatively new form of magnesium, used to treat neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimers disease. 

So, how do you know if you have a magnesium deficiency?

There are some signs that may indicate you are low in this mineral.

Signs of magnesium deficiency include; fatigue, constipation, tension and migrane headaches, hormone imbalances, PMS and loss of appetite. As the deficiency worsens numbness, tingling, muscle contractions/cramps, siezures, personality changes, abnormal heart rythyms and coronary spasms. 

How do you get Magnesium deficiency?

Magnesium deficiency can be due to poor diet, or due to candida, parasites, bacteria or fungi within the body, which are large consumers of magnesium. What happens here is a “competition”, they take a large percentage and then the body is left with less magnesium than it needs to function properly. 

Furthermore,and I think most importantly, a lot of our foods are becoming depleted in magnesium due to modern day farming where crops are not rotated and the land is not rested. This is decreasing the bioavailability of magnesium to us through our food- which is where we get it from. 

So how can we increase our magnesium intake naturally? 

Foods including green leafy vegetables (in particular spinach & kale), pumpkin seeds, yoghurt, black beans, almonds, figs, dark chocolate,bananas, salmon, coriander, cashews, goats cheese and artichokes all contain good amounts of magnesium. Furthermore, one way to increase the bioavailability of the magnesium is to add green leafy vegetables to your juice.

Another way that magnesium can be absorbed is through the skin. Magnesium can help with the relief of muscle tension and also muscle spasms. For this reason, we use magnesium creams in our osteo treatments, to help the relaxation process of the muscles during your treatment. 

Do you think you may be magnesium deficient? If you would like to investigate this further, please book an appointment with our Osteopath and Naturopath, Dr, Rebecca Farthing. She will be able to assess you and put a management plan in place that is specific to you. 


This blog post is an educational tool only.  It is not a replacement for medical advice from a registered and qualified doctor or health professional.

Any other questions not answered here? Get in touch with us!

Phone: (03) 9773 8085

Here are some of our other blogs that you may like to read 🙂


Food Intolerances vs Allergies – What You Need To Know

It’s clear that allergies and intolerances are on the rise. Back in our parent’s day, there was one or two kids in the entire school with food allergies. Now, there are half a dozen in every classroom. And adults are not immune to developing sensitivities either. But what is the difference between food allergies and intolerances, and how are they managed? Here is an introduction to the facts.

What is a food allergy?

A food allergy is an acute reaction from the immune system to a particular food or food particle. 

Symptoms can include:

  • Wheezing
  • Tight chest 
  • Swelling around the face, lips and/or eyes 
  • Swelling of the tongue and throat 
  • Hives, welts and/or rash on the skin 

In severe cases, known as anaphylaxis, the airways can be blocked off by the swelling of the throat. These cases are potentially fatal. 

However, not every allergy is obvious – often young children and babies can experience mild allergies. In this case, chronic diarrhoea, reflux, colic and failure to thrive can be signs of a mild allergy. 

There are 9 foods that are responsible for around 90% of allergic reactions:

  1. Cow’s milk 
  2. Eggs
  3. Peanuts
  4. Tree nuts
  5. Sesame
  6. Soy
  7. Fish
  8. Shellfish 
  9. Wheat

How is it managed?

Because an allergic response is potentially life-threatening, the main goal is to avoid the allergen at all costs. However, there are studies looking into the potential of probiotics for reducing allergies.

If the problematic food is a particularly nutritious one, the diet may need to be altered to ensure that the nutrients are obtained from other sources. People with multiple allergies will also need dietary support to ensure they are getting all of the nutrients they need to be healthy. 

What is a food intolerance?

To put it simply, a food intolerance is a negative reaction to a food, drink, or part of a food. It is generally a slower reaction, with symptoms taking minutes or even hours to develop. Common intolerances include gluten, dairy and fructose, but almost any compound consumed has the potential for intolerance. 

Unlike allergies, a food intolerance is usually due to an inability to digest and absorb the food properly. This might be due to a deficiency of an enzyme, malabsorption, or an improper response from the immune system to a food. 

A lot of people disregard food intolerances. But they are very real, and can do undiagnosed for a long time if your GP or health team aren’t aware of them. 

Symptoms can include:

  • Digestive discomfort
  • Nausea
  • Bloating
  • Gas
  • Diarrhoea and/or constipation 
  • Fatigue
  • Nasal congestion 
  • Headaches
  • Brain fog

As you can see, these symptoms can be very non-specific. So if you’re experiencing them hours after consuming a food, you may not even realise it is the culprit.

How is it managed?

As it is easy to consume a food you are intolerant to, it is easier for it to do more damage to the body. So the first step is to eliminate the problematic food(s). Treating the effects of inflammation and gut bacteria imbalances is also important.

Can you heal intolerances?

Unlike food allergies, an intolerance may not be permanent. They can develop due to poor digestion and absorption. So if you can optimise your digestion and absorption, there is a possibility of healing the intolerance. Depending on the original cause and severity, you may be able to tolerate small doses of the food after healing the gut.

Are food allergies and intolerances getting on your nerves? Dr. Rebecca Farthing (osteopath & naturopath) is here to help. Book an appointment online or call 9773 8085.



.

This blog post is an educational tool only.  It is not a replacement for medical advice from a registered and qualified doctor or health professional.

Any other questions not answered here? Get in touch with us!

Phone: (03) 9773 8085

.

Here are some of our other blogs that you may like to read 🙂





Can Gut Health Affect Autoimmunity?

Autoimmune conditions are on the rise. Autoimmunity can affect any part of the body, from the skin to the thyroid, the gut to the connective tissue. But one aspect that is overlooked is the role that the gut plays in immunity. An unhappy gut can lead to autoimmune disease, but a happy gut can support a happy immune system.

The gut-immune link 

A massive part of the immune system is located in the gut – around 70-80%, in fact. There are many immune cells that are located in the middle layer of the gut. So if you don’t look after your gut, you are going to experience immune problems.

Poor gut health can increase inflammation within the gut and throughout the body. This inflammation can trigger autoimmunity, especially if there is already a family tendency. But looking after the gut can slow down the autoimmune process, and may even reverse symptoms.

Nutrition as a trigger 

Autoimmunity is not inevitable. You might have a family history of autoimmune conditions that increases your risk. But generally, autoimmune conditions are triggered by lifestyle factors. And one of the most common triggers is the food that you eat.

For example, you might have inherited genes that make you more vulnerable to poor absorption or leaky gut. But if you then eat a lot of sugar, gluten, dairy and other foods that can cause inflammation and gut bacteria imbalances, you can tip yourself into an autoimmune condition. 

On the other hand, nutrition can also be one of your most powerful weapons against autoimmune disease. If you focus on foods that calm inflammation, repair the gut lining, balance bacteria and are nutrient-dense, you are less likely to develop autoimmunity. And if you already have autoimmunity, you can reduce your flares and severity of symptoms.

How to support autoimmune conditions naturally 

Every autoimmune condition has different needs in terms of nutrition and lifestyle. But to get you started, here are three simple ways to support your body when you have autoimmunity. 

Cut the junk 

Foods that contain sugar, gluten and dairy can all induce inflammation in an autoimmune situation. To start with, you want to avoid anything that causes inflammation in the body. Don’t worry – you can work on reintroducing them down the track if you tolerate them. 

Focus on wholefoods 

Although the specific foods can vary, a wholefood diet is always the best choice for supporting the gut and immune system. The closer to nature, the better. Fruit, vegetables, good fats and proteins should make up the majority of the food you eat. 

For extra support, make sure you’re getting a variety of fresh produce. The more colours that you consume, the greater the variety of antioxidants you’re eating. Antioxidants are fantastic at reducing inflammation and supporting a healthy immune response. 

Manage stress 

Your mental and emotional health is just as important as your nutrition. Stress can increase inflammation, damage the gut flora and trigger the gut-brain axis.

But stress also plays a role in your nutrition as well. Think about it – when you were about to take a test or go to an interview, how did your tummy feel? Most people experience digestive symptoms of some kind. 

When we’re under stress, the nervous system doesn’t want to waste time on digesting food. Instead, it wants to run away. So when you are stressed out, you won’t absorb as much nutrition from the food you eat. Even if your diet is good, you can still become deficient in nutrients – and that’s bad news when it comes to autoimmunity.


Are you looking for natural support for your autoimmune condition? Our Naturopath and Osteopath, Dr. Rebecca Farthing, has a special interest in autoimmunity and gut health. Book an appointment online or contact us on 9773 8085.

.

This blog post is an educational tool only.  It is not a replacement for medical advice from a registered and qualified doctor or health professional.

Any other questions not answered here? Get in touch with us!

Phone: (03) 9773 8085

.

Here are some of our other blogs that you may like to read 🙂




Aching Joints? Your Natural Approach To Joint Care

There are many things that can cause tender, aching or painful joints. Sometimes, it can just be an acute injury, or it could be something more chronic such as arthritis. But the good news is that your joints can be supported naturally. Here are some of my top tips for sore joints.

Stay hydrated

Keeping yourself hydrated is essential for joint health. It encourages lymphatic flow, allowing the body to flush out toxins from the area. It’s also important for ensuring sufficient blood and nutrient flow to the area, which supports healing.

Everyone has a different need when it comes to hydration. A good starting point is building up to 2L of water per day. If it’s a cold day, herbal teas can make up the bulk of your water intake.

Keep it warm

Many of us were taught to use ice on any type of injury. But the research is starting to show that heat may be better for long-term healing. The same goes for your joints. 

Using heat, such as heat packs or a warm bath, can improve blood flow to the area. This means that more nutrients and healing factors can reach the injured area and repair any damage quickly.

Stock up on soup

Soup is one of the best ways to get nutrients into the body. You can add plenty of vegetables, herbs and spices that are all full of nutrients to support joint healing. Soup made using bones, often termed ‘bone broth’, also contains gelatin. Gelatin contains the amino acids that your body needs to repair damaged joints.

Eat a rainbow

If your joints are sore, what you want is a natural anti-inflammatory. That’s where eating a variety of coloured fruits and vegetables comes in. Fruits and vegetables such as berries and green leafy veg are full of antioxidants that protect the body from inflammation and oxidative stress. Reducing inflammation can reduce pain levels.

Aim to include at least 4-5 different colours on your plate each day. Add a side of blueberries to your breakfast, chop up some red capsicum, carrot and spinach to go with lunch, and mix some mushrooms into your pasta sauce. It’s that easy!

Minimise the junk

While you want to increase your antioxidant and anti-inflammatory foods, you also want to reduce the foods that have the opposite effect. That means foods that are highly processed and packed with things like added sugars and additives.

Many processed foods contain compounds known as AGEs, which have been shown to cause inflammation. So try to find healthier versions of your favourite treats instead.

Consider therapeutic supplements

Food should always be your first approach when it comes to wellbeing. But if you are dealing with a chronic condition like arthritis, supplements are worth considering. There are a number that show promise in joint health, including glucosamine, chondroitin, turmeric and magnesium. 

However, supplements can vary greatly in quality. The best way to find the right supplements for you is to work with a practitioner who can access high-quality therapeutic supplements for you.



Do you have aching joints? Book an appointment with one of our Osteopaths or our Osteopath & Naturopath. They can address your symptoms with hands-on treatment, nutrition and any supplements that you may need. They can also tailor a rehabilitation program just for you.





This blog post is an educational tool only.  It is not a replacement for medical advice from a registered and qualified doctor or health professional.

Any other questions not answered here? Get in touch with us!

Phone: (03) 9773 8085

.

Here are some of our other blogs that you may like to read 🙂




PAINFUL SHOULDER AND WHAT TO DO WITH IT

by Dr. Dan East OSTEOPATH

A painful shoulder can be tricky, frustrating and extremely common. Around 1 in 5 of the general population are affected by a shoulder complaint throughout their life (Pribicevic, 2012), which unfortunately often persist. Even as professionals we admit this to be true. Shoulder pain symptoms can persist for longer than expected, activities which we love doing often have to be modified or avoided, and pain can even finally disappear only to pop up again once we start getting back into routine. This kind of stubbornness is not a great quality for a joint we use all day every day!

Many joints make the shoulder

The complexity of the shoulder ultimately lies in the large number of joints, muscles and other structures which are at play in the region. 

The joints include:

Glenohumeral joint – a ball and socket joint between your humerus (bone of your upper arm) and glenoid cavity (part of your shoulder blade).  

Sternoclavicular joint – between your clavicle (collarbone) and your sternum (breastbone) at the front of your chest. 

Acromioclavicular joint – between your clavicle and the tip of your shoulder blade. 

Scapulothoracic joint – an ‘articulation’ between the scapula and posterior aspect of your ribs and mid back. 

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These joints are all acted upon by various muscles, which change depending on whether you’re in a static position or working dynamically (in motion). Everything needs to be working efficiently and firing at just the right time to allow for smooth shoulder movement and adequate strength. With the amount of joints, combined with over 10 major muscles for the shoulder and other structures including bursa, ligaments and labrum, you can see how issues could arise. 

So, shoulder pain has recently begun, or is still niggling after months (or even years). What to do?

First of all

It’s important to know that your shoulder is likely to not require an X-Ray, Ultrasound or MRI. Most shoulder issues do not need imaging, and remember that this can always be considered down the track anyway if things aren’t going to plan. Gill et al (2014) points out that relevance of findings of shoulder pathology on MRI scans is questionable, as many findings are even evident in asymptomatic patients (those without any pain at all). 

Cortisone injections and/or surgery

These shouldn’t be the first port of call in most cases either. The recent evidence suggests corticosteroid injection provides significant but temporary pain relief, which most often does not outweigh the combination of safety and pain relief seen with manual therapy and exercise. Unless the shoulder injury is quite severe, conservative treatment such as a strengthening and stretching program is generally considered the first line therapy. Injection can always be seen as a plan B if our program fails. 

The focus

The focus initially should be on a 6-12 week shoulder strengthening program devised with your health professional. They will be able to assess any weaknesses you have and help devise a program suited to you and your condition. They will also be able to make sure you are completing your exercises effectively and safely.

To strengthen the shoulder complex, we at Total Balance like to start out by focusing on 2 main (and simple) components:

  1. Rotator Cuff strength – the rotator cuff (RC) is a group of muscles which surround your glenohumeral joint and activate movement of the shoulder. 
  2. Scapula (shoulder blade) control – to allow the rotator cuff to work efficiently during motion, and to avoid impingement due to narrowing of the shoulder joint space, the scapular needs to be controlled and positioned effectively. 

To strengthen these areas, Heron et al (2017) suggests that the best outcomes result from using a combination of open-chain and closed-chain exercises. (In an openchain exercise, the body is stationary while the limb moves. In closedchain exercise, the limb is stationary while the body moves). Below are 3 basic exercises, shown in the video, which can be used in the early stages of strength progression:

Exercises for Rotator Cuff strength
Prone Y Arm Lift
Interval – 3-4 sets of 10-15 reps. 

Load – nil to begin. Gravity will be adequate!

Sidelying Glenohumeral (Shoulder) external rotation

Interval – 3 sets of 12 reps
Load – begin with 2-4kg dumbbell. May need to increase

Exercise for Scapular control –
Wall push up
Interval – 3 sets of 8-10 reps

Load – nil

Remember….

Stop these exercises if your pain becomes sharp during any motion. Your health professional can then assess your movement during the exercise in your next consult and may need to modify accordingly. 

Do you have shoulder pain? Book an appointment with one of our Osteopaths. They can address your symptoms with hands-on treatment a tailored rehabilitation program for you.

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This blog post is an educational tool only.  It is not a replacement for medical advice from a registered and qualified doctor or health professional.

Any other questions not answered here? Get in touch with us!

Phone: (03) 9773 8085

.

Here are some of our other blogs that you may like to read 🙂


REFERENCES


Brukner, P., & Khan, K. (2016). Brukner & Khan’s Clinical Sports Medicine: Injuries (Vol. 1). McGraw-Hill Education Australia.
Gill, T. K., Shanahan, E. M., Allison, D., Alcorn, D., & Hill, C. L. (2014). Prevalence of abnormalities on shoulder MRI in symptomatic and asymptomatic older adults. International journal of rheumatic diseases17(8), 863-871.
Heron, S. R., Woby, S. R., & Thompson, D. P. (2017). Comparison of three types of exercise in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy/shoulder impingement syndrome: A randomized controlled trial. Physiotherapy103(2), 167-173.

Pribicevic, M. (2012). The epidemiology of shoulder pain: A narrative review of the literature. In Pain in perspective. IntechOpen.


Image 1: pic @ https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/476537204307049671/
Image 2: pic @ https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/506795764289694097/

What Osteopathy Is

Osteopathy is a system of manual therapy that uses hands-on techniques to assess, diagnose and treat the entire musculoskeletal system.

Osteopaths examine more than just the site of pain or discomfort, they also assess surrounding and related body parts, ensuring an accurate diagnosis and comprehensive treatment plan for every individual.

Osteopaths aim to improve the quality and range of movement of the body, which in turn will affect the muscular, circulatory and neurological body components which all help to maintain optimal health.

Osteopaths identify factors that cause and continue to aggravate your condition. This may include work, sport and lifestyle habits. Osteopaths provide patients with tailored advice on stretching and rehabilitation strategies to enhance your recovery and reduce the likelihood of recurring injuries. This holistic treatment approach promotes self awareness and encourages the patient to play a part in their recovery.

Osteopaths use a range a treatment techniques to ensure an effective and comfortable treatment. These include soft-tissue massage, joint articulation and manipulation, muscle energy and stretching. Specially developed ‘slow release techniques’, including cranio-sacral therapy, are commonly used in the elderly and the very young, to ensure that the treatment is both safe and comfortable.

Being government registered health care practitioners, patients do not need a referral to see and Osteopath.

What can Osteopaths treat?

Osteopaths can treat a wide range of disorders, some of these include:

  • Back & Neck Pain
  • Headaches & Migraines
  • Postural Problems
  • Sciatica
  • Nerve related injuries
  • Sports Injuries
  • Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSI)
  • Tennis Elbow
  • Golfers Elbow
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Shin Splints
  • Knee Pain
  • Heel/ Foot Pain
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Asthma
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Pregnancy/ Post-Natal Care
  • Whiplash

Are you looking for an osteopath to talk to? Book an appointment with one of our Osteopaths. They can address your symptoms with hands-on treatment a tailored rehabilitation program for you.

.

This blog post is an educational tool only.  It is not a replacement for medical advice from a registered and qualified doctor or health professional.

Any other questions not answered here? Get in touch with us!

Phone: (03) 9773 8085

.

Here are some of our other blogs that you may like to read 🙂